Mayos Music
Guitar Lessons and Instrument Repair

What Makes A Good Teacher

At MayosMusic we offer Private, Semi-Private and Group guitar, bass, ukulele, banjo, fretted instrument and auto-harp lessons. Plus, we are a complete luthier service that includes guitar and amplifier repairs/restorations. Through the years we have been asked numerous "Guitar Lesson" and "Guitar Repair" related questions (many repeatedly) by new/current/old and prospective students and customers. Here is our answer to: What makes a good teacher?


Playing and teaching guitar are two very different skills.  Many players as well as students often assume that because a player has acquired the skills to play or perform well, that they then possess the skills needed to teach well.  This is not always true. 

For example, did you know that the neck breaks into five positions then repeats at the 12th fret, and that in every position you can play a chord, scale (more than one type) and an arpeggio?  Good teachers will have lessons about rhythms that overlap and can substitute one for the other, learning the differences between diatonic and chromatic scales and chords, and how to train and develop your ear.  I teach flat-picking, finger-picking, Travis picking, and slack key techniques,  hammer-ons, pull-offs, tapping, chicken plucking, bends, use of the tremolo bar (whammy bar), use of pedals such as the wah pedal, and many other direct playing techniques.

Those players/teachers that teach only songs are not really teaching the instrument (guitar).  Songs are important and fun and hold the students interests, but without further knowledge of chords, scales and arpeggios, reading standard notation, chord diagrams, rhythm charts, music theory, etc. the student will find himself always coming back for the next song.  It is better to learn what the teacher knows and how to begin to learn to figure out the songs by yourself (or better yet be able to make your own music and write songs).

I will end by drawing an analogy.  Think of building your guitar knowledge like building a jig-saw puzzle.  You group like shapes, like end pieces, group like colors (such as blue sky, green grass, brown earth, etc.) and then start putting it all together as the shapes come together.  That is to say that every time you learn something new (chords, scales, riffs, rhythms, arpeggios, techniques, etc.) try to connect that new information to what you already know and only when you discover a new concept, do you create a new category.  You are building the jig-saw puzzle of guitar knowledge (and every picture will be unique).

Experience since 1968
Providing Guitar Lessons and Guitar/Amp Repairs in Southern California, South Bay Cities and Greater Los Angeles Area,
Located in Manhattan Beach, CA 90266 and Torrance, CA 90503

CALL or TEXT:
(310) 955 - 0246
Email:
MayoGuitarAndAmp@GMail.com